Tuesday, August 25, 2009

Original Song Project: Morgan Young - La Ranchera


Back in the saddle after far too long not playing. All work and no play makes flip-siders a dull bunch. Today's entry is something that is inspired by, but far removed from, The Zombies' I Remember When I Loved Her and The Who's The Good's Gone. I also should also throw a tip of the hat to the 13th Floor Elevators' Rollercoaster which I have been listening to a ton recently. Duane Eddy and Hugo Montenegro should get some props too. This little number is called La Ranchera. I hope you like.


11 comments:

  1. Although I was initially skeptical, I think I hear all your influences. The one I was least sure about, Rollercoaster, is the main influence to your bridge, if I'm not mistaken. With that settled, Good's Gone seems least obvious, but I've settled on its notice in the tonal quality to the intro chord changes. Duane is all about your twang, what else! That lead in the bridge rings a bell that you did not credit, but not coming to me. Also, not sure about the Tomei nude thing, other than general fantasies, and about George, your dog, I hope his cough gets better. Nice work.

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  2. The Good's Gone influence is, admittedly, an after thought. "oh, this kinda sounds like...". Same with the Zombies one but I know I subconsciously composed the riff with that deep in my mind. The Elevators one is a direct tip of the hat. Marisa Tomei did play a large part in this as that night I had just watched a pretty mediocre movie -- Wild Hogs -- in which she wore sexy western outfits through the whole film. What's the George reference?

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  3. Spooky! I like this composition because it is successful at conveying an element of narrative structure. It begs the question, “what’s the story?” As the title implies, I place it in the old west and presume the plot involves the likes of characters such as Jake Spoon and Captain Call from McMurtry’s epic Lonesome Dove.

    The tune is unique in that it is disquieting and tranquil at the same time. I’ll admit the more I listened, the more I enjoyed it.

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  4. Thanks for the comments Serene.. I will say, first off, that anyone's take on any narrative is a correct take. I just like that they/you are reading a narrative.

    I do strive to create an image with my songs. I like your take on it and you are not far from how I envision it as well. I just finished reading my fourth Cormac McCarthy book, All The Pretty Horses, and that played very large in my composition. Generally speaking, riding out on horseback for days at a time in the Mexican desert and taking shelter in any arroyo you can find. Tranquil and disquieting are two aspects of the composition for which I was striving, so I very much am glad you picked up on that.

    As always, thanks for all the comments.

    M

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  5. Hey, I can't find a link to actually listen to this. What's the deal? Am I ignorant, or is the link to the audio file not working?

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  6. click the title above the picture.

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  7. This is a fantastic song! (Thanks for helping me to figure out how to listen--sometimes I am none-too-bright.) The title is quite apt, vivid images of traveling through the desert or the plains (either on horseback or in an old pickup) are conjured up. I really like the sparseness and restraint, and the modulations are choice. I definitely recognized the inspirations you mentioned, though my first thought was the Shadows. References aside, this song stand on its own. Very cinematic, this song oughta be in pictures. (If I were still playing with my surf band I would insist on adding this song to the set-list.)

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  8. Thanks for the kind words GB. It's one of those songs that was composed as it was written and you kinda sit back and go, "hmmmm, that was interesting." Given a second chance I would probably end it differently, but that's just me.

    Hank Marvin/The Shadows have always been a huge influence on me. In fact, I have the Shadows sitting in my car stereo right now.

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  9. Morgan,
    Great Tune. I like it a lot, i'm a little dense when it comes to referentials, but I think the George reference is obvious. You were born to almost die slowly and romantically in the desert but find that verdent oasis and cheat death at the last moment, with a mirage of Marissa keeping you company. Good mixing too. Someday I need to learn the software and the skills.

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  10. Very nice. I definitely hear the Elevators and Zombies tunes in there, but there is also a Calexico influence, no? Did you put a Bigsby on your Tele by any chance?

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  11. Calexico? Not a direct one (to m knowledge, at least). I would say more that there is a similarity to Calexico than an influence.

    Yeah, I put a Bigsby on the Tele about 2 years ago. I use it infrequently but it can definitely come in handy when trying to pull off those Duane Eddy deep bends.

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